10 Tips for a stress-free entrepreneurship

Maybe the most frightening thing about starting a business is to know that it takes a lot of dedication: time management, day to day tasks, strategic plans etc… These important, serious obligations and responsibilities may bring stress. That’s perfectly normal. But you can easily learn some strategies to create time for yourself between tasks. So, here are some advice from startup leaders to create time for yourself and relax a bit:

Treat your time like a financial budget: “Be fiscally responsible. Budget free time first, much like you would put money into a savings account. Then build a monthly budget around the remainder of your expenses or time spent working. By sticking to your budget, you’re forced to allocate the expenses you can afford and cut unnecessary expenses. For example, you can decline meetings you don’t need to attend, or delegate client questions to team members who are more than capable of handling them on their own. Challenge yourself each day to unplug outside the office and hold yourself accountable to your time budget.” – Yuri Sagalov, co-founder and CEO, AeroFS

Unchain yourself from your desk: “There is nothing like a change of scenery to get creative juices flowing in ways they wouldn’t otherwise. Take time out of the office and use that time to think creatively about the business. This sends a message to the team that unconventional thinking is good, rewarded and something to constantly seek out.” – Sandra Ponce de Leon, co-founder, Lifetime Memori, Inc., creators of Trunx

Actively make time for yourself: “I need euphoria, peace and tranquility — aka, the expensive luxury of doing nothing. These things have to be incorporated in your daily living. I always find time to meditate at least 20 minutes a day. I find the time to get in the car and drive an hour to a place unknown, because the ride is silent and peaceful. You have the time, but you also have to make the time. Learn how to create time for yourself. There is nothing wrong with stepping away from the desk or computer and saying, ‘Enough is enough. I am taking a break.’” – Jimmy Gilchrist, founder, Rock N Dade



Stick to your routine: “My business requires so much traveling, so I try hard to stay grounded and healthy no matter where I am. I keep my routine and eat as well as I can to take care of myself. Every day, I try to meditate in the morning, and I do yoga at the end of the day as often as I can. I have very challenging and exhausting days, but when you do what you love, it’s easy to get re-energized and start in again the next day.” – Jennifer Adams, CEO, Jennifer Adams Worldwide

Delegate tasks to free up your time: “To be a successful entrepreneur, a person must sacrifice the most valuable asset in life: time. Yet, to avoid burn out, it is crucial to understand time management. Remember, you are not married to the business, and it does not love you back. Try to delegate, and hire a motivated and competent staff. Sometimes, it is hard to let go of micromanaging, but in order to grow and think big, you must learn how to trust and develop talent.” – Elan Katz, CEO, Cure Urgent Care

Pursue a nonwork hobby you’re passionate about: “Pick one thing you really love doing that has nothing to do with work, whether it’s reading, dancing or singing. Take some time to do that nonwork-related activity and make it a routine.”– Katherine Niefeld, president and CEO, BlinkPR

Try a different tool: “Take a week away from your computer and try running everything from your mobile devices. It’ll force you to communicate and get closer with your team.”– Konrad Billetz, founder, Frameri

Build a great team: “Entrepreneurs work longer and harder hours than anyone else, but if your heart isn’t in it, then trying to make your business a success is going to burn you out. Are you spending time on the aspects you love or are you finding yourself stuck crunching numbers or micromanaging others? Hiring the right people and building the right systems will help others carry your vision, so you can focus on what you love in and outside of the business.” – Eric Casaburi, CEO and founder, Retro Fitness

Image Credit: thrive15franchising.com



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Author: OOS Team

Explaining bits and bytes of startups and entrepreneurship.

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